Jan 21, 2020  
2019-2020 Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Catalog

Policies and Regulations



For further information about all of the policies, please refer to the University Policy Manual or the Academic Senate Policy webpage.

Administrative and Academic Policies are subject to change at any time as policies are issued or updated. Additional policies that apply to students and others connected to CSU Channel Islands (CI) may be found in Title 5 of the California Code of Regulations, the CSU Memoranda of Understanding, CSU system wide policies, and within other University publications. As an agency of the State of California, CI is subject to state and federal laws and regulations.

Information Technology

Information Security

CSU Channel Islands is committed to protecting the confidentiality, integrity and availability of campus information assets. Unauthorized modification, deletion, or disclosure of information assets can compromise the mission of the CSU, violate individual privacy rights, and possibly constitute a criminal act. The Board of Trustees of the CSU has overall responsibility for the protection of information assets, and has established an Information Security Policy (ICSUAM 8000.0). It is the policy and practice of Channel Islands to abide by the letter and spirit of the CSU policy.

For a full description, view the CSU Information Security webpage: http://www.calstate.edu/icsuam/sections/8000/.

Responsible Use of Information Technology Resources

The complete Statement on Information Security can be found on the CI website at https://policy.csuci.edu/statements/information-security.htm.  

 

Admissions 

Admission Exceptions

Accountability

The Director of Admissions & Recruitment

Applicability

Any applicant who will not meet the published admission eligibility standards, or who has applied and has received an official denial from the University, may submit a letter of appeal to the Admissions Exception Committee.

Definition(s)

Admissions Exception Committee - Composed of two faculty members (appointed by the Chair of the Academic Senate), one representative from Academic Advising (appointed by the director of Academic Advising), one representative from Admissions and Recruitment (appointed by the director of Admissions and Recruitment), one representative from the Educational Opportunity Program (appointed by the director of Access, Orientation, and Transition Programs), one representative from Disability Resource Programs (appointed by the director of Access, Orientation, and Transition Programs), and one student (appointed by the president of student government). Each member of the committee serves a term of two admissions cycles (spring and fall).

Exception - A request to be admitted despite not having met all CSU admissions requirements (not a request to waive or substitute requirements). A limited number of admissions exceptions are allocated to this campus each academic year.

Denial - A formal letter from the University denying admission.

Extenuating Circumstances - Any condition that the applicant believes explains the reason for failure to meet admission criteria and that warrants the review of the application.

Petition - May be by form or letter and must include a statement of extenuating factors, including the potential hardship to be incurred if admission is denied as well as the reason the applicant’s past record is not indicative of present capabilities.

Policy

Any applicant for undergraduate studies who has been denied admission, or will be denied admission, to the University may request admission by submitting a letter of appeal requesting that the application be reviewed. Under the purview of the director of Admissions and Recruitment, the Admissions Exception Committee regularly reviews these letters along with the application and supporting documents. The committee will review the request and recommend whether or not the applicant’s petition warrants a granting of admission. Key to the committee’s decision is the applicant’s ability to succeed in the University environment given the explanation and documentation provided. The committee considers a number of factors, normally favoring applicants who are close to qualifying and whose appeals both adequately explain the failure to meet admission criteria and demonstrate the motivation to succeed.

(SP11-12) 

Appeal of Admission Decision

Section 89030.7 of the California Education Code requires the CSU establishes specific requirements for appeal procedures for a denial of admission. Each CSU campus must publish appeal procedures for applicants denied admission to the University. The procedure is limited to addressing campus decisions to deny an applicant admission to the University.

Admissions appeal procedures must address the basis for appeals, provide 15 business days for an applicant to submit an appeal, stipulate a maximum of one appeal per academic term, provide specific contact information for the individual or office to which the appeal should be submitted and must also be published on the campus website.

Application Roll-Over

The complete policy text can be found on the CI website.

(AA.12.001)

Intent to Enroll and Orientation

The complete policy text can be found on the CI website.

(AA.12.007)

Submission of Official Transcripts

The complete policy text can be found on the CI website. 

(AA.12.005)

 

Course Credit

Advanced Placement (AP) Exam Credit

CI grants credit toward its undergraduate degrees for successful completion of examinations of the Advanced Placement Program of the College Board. Students who present scores of three or better will be granted up to 6 semester units (9 quarter units) of college credit. CI credit for past (and current) exams is available on the Academic Advising website under Transfer Credit Information at http://www.csuci.edu/academics/advising/articulation.htm. . Grade reports are sent automatically to CI if requested by the student at exam time. The student may also order the report through the AP website at http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/ap/exgrd_rep.html or by calling (609) 771-7300 or (888) 225-5427, Mon-Fri 8 am to 4:45 pm, Eastern Time. Reports should be sent to Records and Registration.

(SP01-37)

Credit by Examination

CI may grant unit credit to those students who pass examinations that have been approved for credit system-wide. These are: the CSU English Equivalence Examination (EEE) and the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP). Specific information on credit earned may be found by visiting the Academic Advising website located at http://www.csuci.edu/academics/advising/articulation.htm.

Students may challenge courses by taking examinations developed at Cal State Channel Islands. Credit shall be awarded to those who pass them successfully. Credits earned in this manner will be recorded as “CR” credit on the student’s transcript and will be counted toward the total number of units required for the degree although they will not be included in calculation of the grade-point average. Credit by examination may not be used to fulfill the minimum residence requirement.

Credit for Military Service

Credit will be allowed toward graduation to any student submitting evidence DD 214 or DD 295 of satisfactory completion of Basic Training. Students with service in the Air Force, Army and Coast Guard will receive 4 units of credit. Students with service in the Marine Corps will earn 8 units of credit. Credit is allowed in accordance with the recommendation by the American Council on Education (ACE). Other military courses completed may earn baccalaureate credit as outlined in the Guide to the Evaluation of Education Experience in the Armed Forces. CI has final discretion on where these units will be applied. Specific information on credit earned may be found by visiting the Academic Advising website located at http://www.csuci.edu/academics/advising/articulation.htm.

Credit for Military Service, Academic

Students shall be granted credit toward the Baccalaureate degree based on the American Council on Education (ACE) Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experiences in the Armed Services. Three units of General Education Area E credit will be awarded for military basic training with any additional credit for basic training recommended by the ACE Guide given as free electives.

In addition, up to 30 credits may be awarded as a combination of free electives based on ACE recommendations and/or the following specific credits:

  1. Three to four units of General Education Area C3a credit will be awarded for Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center proficiency exams based on ACE’s guidelines in the National Guide to College Credit for Workforce Training. Any additional credit for language proficiency recommended by the ACE Guide will count as free electives.
  2. Major or other General Education credit may be awarded by petition.

Students should contact Enrollment Services for instructions on receiving credit.

(SP10-08)

Credit for Non-collegiate Instruction

Cal State Channel Islands grants undergraduate degree credit for successful completion of non-collegiate instruction, either military or civilian, appropriate to the baccalaureate degree, which has been recommended by the Commission on Educational Credit and Credentials of the American Council on Education. The number of units allowed are those recommended in the Guide to the Evaluation of Educational Experience in the Armed Services and the National Guide to Educational Credit for Training Programs. Specific information on credit earned may be found by visiting the Academic Advising website located at http://www.csuci.edu/academics/advising/articulation.htm.

Credit Toward Graduation for Courses Taken Outside CI

A student may earn credit toward graduation for courses taken outside of CI as follows:

Transfer of Undergraduate and Graduate Credit from Another Accredited Institution

Students who were in good standing at another accredited institution may, within maximums, transfer credit for baccalaureate or graduate degree course work. Course equivalency for major requirements is subject to the determination and discretion of the University; students are cautioned that while the University will accept transferred courses for unit credit towards admission, it is under no obligation to accept those same courses for subject credit to fulfill requirements. Policy regarding transfer of courses from California community colleges differs in some respects. Individual program regulations for specific transfer limitations should be consulted.

Transfer of Undergraduate Credit From Accredited Community Colleges

A maximum of 70 semester units earned in a community college may be applied toward the baccalaureate degree, with the following limitations and stipulations:

  1. No upper-division credit may be allowed for courses taken in a community college;
  2. No credit may be allowed for professional courses in education taken in a community college, other than introduction to education courses;
  3. Students who transfer general education certification are still required to complete at least 9 units of upper-division general education courses at CI.

Note: Articulation agreements with the California Community Colleges may be found at www.ASSIST.org. ASSIST also provides CSU General Education and IGETC certification lists.

(SP01-36)

International Baccalaureate (IB) Exam Credit

CI grants credit toward its undergraduate degrees for successful completion of IB examinations. IB exams at the Higher Level (HL) passed with a score of 4 or higher will earn up to 8 units of semester credit. Exams passed earn a grade of credit (CR) and are not calculated into the GPA. CI credit for past (and current) exams is available on the Academic Advising website under Transfer Credit Information at www.csuci.edu/academics/advising/. IB transcripts are sent automatically to CI upon completion of the exam if requested by the student. For more information about transcript requests, please call the IB North American office in New York City at (212) 696-4464, Mon- Fri 9:30 am to 4:30 pm, Eastern Time or send an e-mail to transcripts.ibna@ibo.org. Transcripts should be sent to Records and Registration.

International Program Credit

Course credits earned in universities abroad may be accepted for degree credit at CI subject to evaluation by the Admissions and Recruitment office. Specific course equivalencies may require consultation with individual program coordinators. CI students who desire, subsequently, to take courses at a foreign university for degree credit must have each such course approved in advance in writing by the program coordinator.

(SP01-36)

Extended University

Extension Courses

Students may take extension courses without matriculating at CI provided that they meet course prerequisites. Extension courses may be applied to degree and credential requirements with approval of the degree program coordinator. Extension courses do not satisfy the University’s residence requirement for graduation. Up to 24 units earned through Open University (see Open University) and Extension may be applied to a bachelor’s degree at CI, and up to 9 units may be applied to a master’s degree.

(SP01-36)

Open University

Open University permits non-matriculated students to register concurrently with matriculated students in regular classes. Up to 24 units earned through Open University and Extension (see Extension Programs) may be applied to a bachelor’s degree at CI, and up to 9 units may be applied to a master’s degree.

(SP01-36)

Financial Aid

EOP Grant Awarding

The complete policy text can be found on the CI website.

(SA.10.016)

Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress

Accountability

Financial Aid office

Applicability

All registered students at CSU Channel Islands receiving financial aid assistance.

Definitions

Appeal - A process by which a student who is not meeting the institution’s satisfactory academic progress standards petitions the institution for reconsideration of the student’s eligibility for title IV, HEA program assistance.

Financial Aid Probation - A status assigned by an institution to a student who fails to make satisfactory academic progress and who has appealed and has had eligibility for aid reinstated.

Financial Aid Warning - A status assigned to a student who fails to make satisfactory academic progress at an institution that evaluates academic progress at the end of each payment period. Schools that evaluate SAP at the end of each payment period (including summer terms) have the option to add a warning payment period, followed by a probationary payment period, prior to any termination of federal student aid eligibility. The student may receive aid under the warning and probationary periods. The warning option is not available to schools that evaluate SAP less frequently.

Note: A Financial Aid Warning or Financial Aid Probation (relating to financial aid eligibility) is different from Academic Probation (relating to your overall academic standing with the University).

Maximum Timeframe:

  1. For an undergraduate program measured in credit hours, a period that is no longer than 150 percent of the published length of the educational program, as measured in credit hours;
  2. For a graduate program, a period defined by the institution that is based on the length of the educational program.

Policy

This policy meets the requirement for strictness as it matches the institutional policy for a student enrolled in the same educational program who is not receiving Title IV assistance. The policy is organized in the following sections that illustrate the standards required to maintain good standing and satisfactory academic progress to retain Title IV funding:

  1. Quantitative Component-units completed
    1. Pace - percent of units completed
    2. Maximum unit limit
    3. Treatment of Repeated Coursework
    4. Treatment of Credit/Noncredit Coursework
    5. Transfer Units
    6. Change of Major - effect on unit load
  2. Qualitative Component-grading
    1. Grading
    2. Academic Disqualification
    3. Remedial Coursework
  3. Evaluation of Academic Progress Over Time
    1. Maximum Time Limit
  4. Consequences
    1. Financial Aid Warning Period
    2. Requirements to Re-establish Financial Aid Eligibility
    3. Appeal Process
    4. FR Funding/Reinstatement Rules following a SAP Appeal

SAP Review Criteria

Any financial aid award is tentative until the academic record is reviewed. For entering transfer students, the review is based on the academic record on file at the time of first consideration (or when information becomes available).

SECTION I: Quantitative Component

Pace (e.g., percent of units completed):

Pace is determined by calculating a student’s ratio of overall cumulative CI units earned to their cumulative CI units attempted. The following schedule designates the minimum percentage of amount of work that a student must successfully complete at the end of each increment to complete his or her educational program within the maximum timeframe. As a student progresses toward graduation, the expected ratio or percentage increases.

Degrees Number of Cumulative Units Attempted Minimum Percentage of Units Earned (Percentage of cumulative units taken with passing) grade divided by cumulative units attempted.)
Undergraduate 1 to 29.99 75%
  30 to 59.99 80%
  60 to 89.99 85%
  90 to 180 90%
Second BA 1 to 45.01 90%
Post-baccalaureate/ Credential 1 to 52.50 90%
Graduate 1 to 49.50 90%

Maximum Unit Limit:

The maximum unit limit for undergraduate student aid eligibility is 150% of the unit requirement for graduation, as set forth by the Federal Department of Education and CI. Since most undergraduate majors at CI require 120 units to graduate, the maximum unit limit is therefore 180 attempted units (120 x 1.5 = 180). In addition, regulations require that all undergraduate transfer units MUST be considered in determining progress toward graduation within the 150% maximum time frame (regardless of whether or not the student received prior financial aid, completed the coursework, or if the course work counts or not toward their degree objective). The maximum unit limit for 2nd BA/BS student aid eligibility is 150% of the unit requirement for graduation, as set forth by the Federal Department of Education and CI. Since most  undergraduate majors at CI require 120 units to graduate, and the student has already completed three years (approximately 90 units) of general education coursework, the maximum unit limit is therefore 45 attempted units (120 - 90 = 30 x 1.5 = 45). In addition, regulations require that all undergraduate transfer units MUST be considered in determining progress toward graduation within the 150% maximum time frame (regardless of whether or not the student received prior financial aid, completed the coursework, or if the course work counts or not toward their degree objective).

The maximum unit limit for post-baccalaureate Teacher Credential student aid eligibility is 150% of the unit requirement for graduation, as set forth by the Federal Department of Education and the CI. Since most Credential programs at CI require 35 units to graduate, the maximum unit limit is therefore 52.50 attempted units (35 x 1.5 = 52.50). In addition, regulations require that all post-baccalaureate transfer units MUST be considered in determining progress toward graduation within the 150% maximum time frame (regardless of whether or not the student received prior financial aid, completed the coursework, or if the course work counts or not toward their degree objective).

The maximum unit limit for graduate aid eligibility is 150% of the unit requirement for graduation, as set forth by the Federal Department of Education and CI. Since most graduate programs at CI require 33 units to graduate, the maximum unit limit is therefore 49.50 attempted units (33 x 1.5 = 49.50). In addition, regulations require that all graduate transfer units MUST be considered in determining progress toward graduation within the 150% maximum time frame (regardless of whether or not the student received prior financial aid, completed the coursework, or if the course work counts or not toward their degree objective).

Note: Maximum unit limits for post-baccalaureate and graduate programs may be greater than those listed above if a student’s program(s) requires more than the typical unit requirement.

Treatment of Repeated Coursework:

The Financial Aid office accepts repeated courses consistent with University Policy limiting these units to 16 semester earned units in which a student earned a prior C- or lower grade. Additional repeated coursework may demonstrate unwillingness or inability to progress. In such cases, the financial aid staff may determine that a student is not making satisfactory academic progress, according to policy. Please be aware that repeat courses are not identified in the computer system as “repeat courses” until your grades are entered for the term. Therefore, repeat courses that have been previously completed (with a passing grade) will be averaged into your GPA and cumulative units earned, which may negatively affect your SAP. Treatment of Credit/Non-credit Coursework: Because the University limits to 12 the number of general education CR/NC units that can be used toward graduation, the Financial Aid Department views CR/ NC courses in excess of the limit as not applicable toward the degree. Students who exceed the maximum while receiving aid funds are subject to review of continued eligibility.

Transfer Units:

The government requires that all transfer units MUST be considered in determining progress toward graduation within a 150% maximum time frame.

Change of Major:

When considering a change in major, it is the responsibility of the student to be aware of the maximum unit limit guidelines, as outlined in this policy.

SECTION II: Qualitative Component: Acceptable Grade Point Average

All students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 (overall “C” average) to maintain financial aid eligibility. Students placed on academic probation will also be placed on financial aid probation for not making satisfactory academic progress. Being on probation will allow a student to receive financial aid assistance for one semester. At the conclusion of the semester, the Financial Aid office will review the student’s academic record and determine if they are in good standing and therefore able to receive aid for the subsequent semester(s). Students disqualified by the University are automatically ineligible for financial aid based on qualitative standards of not achieving a 2.0 (C average) grade point average.

Grading:

The quality of an aid recipient’s coursework is also monitored. Units are counted as earned only if one of the following grades is received: “A” through “D-“, Credit (CR), Satisfactory Progress (SP)

  • The following grades are NOT counted as earned for satisfactory progress:
    • Incomplete (I)*
    • Incomplete Fail (IC)*
    • Withdrawal (W)**
    • Failure (F)
    • Unauthorized Incomplete (U)
    • Unauthorized Withdrawal (WU)
    • No Credit (NC)
    • Report Delayed (RD)
    • Audit (AU)

* Any student who was granted an incomplete “I” grade and failed to meet the conditions of the incomplete grade contract after one year, will be given a grade of “IC” which is equivalent to an “F” and will be assessed under the qualitative standards of the SAP policy.

**If a student has withdrawn from the university three times, this may demonstrate unwillingness or inability to progress. In such cases, the Financial Aid staff may determine that a student is subject to a more extensive review by the either the Director of Financial Aid, or the SAP Appeals Committee. Aid will remain on hold until this review is completed.

Academic Disqualification:
Students who are academically disqualified from CI by the Records Office are not eligible for financial aid.

Remedial Coursework:
CI does not consider remedial coursework in determining a student’s SAP.

SECTION III: Evaluation of Academic Progress over Time: Maximum Time Limit

The maximum time limit for undergraduate student aid eligibility is 150% of the normal length of time required to complete a program of study as a full-time equivalent student, as set forth by the Federal Department of Education and the CI. It will take 5 years to complete most undergraduate programs if a student is enrolled in only 12 units per term (120 units/24 full-time units per year = 5 years). Thus, the maximum time limit is 7.5 years (150% * 5 years = 7.5 years).

The maximum time limit for 2nd BA/BS student aid eligibility is 150% of the normal length of time required to complete a program of study as a full-time equivalent student, as set forth by the Federal Department of Education and the CI. It will take 1.25 years to complete most 2nd BA/BS programs (since the student has already completed their general education coursework) if a student is enrolled in only 12 units per term (120 units - 90 GE units = 30/24 full-time units per year = 1.5 years). Thus, the maximum time limit is 2.25 years (150% * 1.5 years = 2.5 years).

The maximum time limit for post-baccalaureate Teacher Credential student aid eligibility is 150% of the normal length of time required to complete a program of study as a full-time equivalent student, as set forth by the Federal Department of Education and CI. It will take 1.5 years to complete most Credential programs if a student is enrolled in only 12 units per term (35 units/24 full-time units per year = 1.46 years). Thus, the maximum time limit is 2.25 years (150% * 1.46 = 2.19 years).

The maximum time limit for graduate aid eligibility is 150% of the normal length of time required to complete a program of study as a full-time equivalent student, as set forth by the Federal Department of Education and CI. It will take 2 years to complete most graduate programs if a student is enrolled in 12 units per term (49.5 units/24 full-time units per year = 2.06 years). Thus, the maximum time limit is 3.0 years (150% * 2.06 = 3.09 years).

Note: Maximum time limits for post-baccalaureate students may be greater than those listed above if a student’s program(s) requires more than the typical 35 units.

SECTION IV: Consequences

Financial Aid Warning Period:
If a student does not meet the SAP policy guidelines, as stated above, they will be placed on Warning for the next term. A student on financial aid Warning may continue to receive Title IV aid despite a determination that the student is not meeting SAP standards. This will allow the student time to get back into good SAP standing, while continuing to receive financial aid. If the student continues not to meet the SAP policy guidelines after the Warning term, they will no longer be eligible to receive financial aid.

Requirements to Re-establish Financial Aid Eligibility:
Students who have lost their financial aid eligibility due to insufficient Percentage of Units Earned, or low GPA, and do not appeal, or their appeal is denied, may generally reestablish eligibility as follows:

  • GPA: The qualitative requirement (i.e., CI cumulative GPA) is associated with units completed while at CI; therefore the additional units needed to increase your CI GPA must be completed at CI.
  • Units: The quantitative requirement (i.e., CI cumulative units earned) may be re-established either:
    1. Permanently (i.e., regain eligibility form this point forward, pending any future unit deficiencies) by completing the total number of units needed to increase your Percentage of Units Earned to an acceptable range for your appropriate grade level without receiving financial aid. Deficient units may be completed at CI, or they may be completed through CI Extended University, if the coursework is transferable and satisfies your CI graduation requirements; or,
    2. Temporarily (i.e., regain eligibility on a term-by-term basis for the remainder of the academic year. A new appeal may need to be submitted for the next academic year) by transferring in units completed at another college (completed after financial aid was denied at CI) that are equal or greater than the total number of units deficient at CI. Units must satisfy your CI graduation requirements. It is the student’s responsibility to meet the reinstatement requirements, provide academic transcripts for transfer units to the CI Admissions & Records Office (AR), and to provide proof of completed units to the financial aid office.

Appeal Process:
If the student has mitigating factors that have hindered their Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) toward graduation, including death of a relative, injury or illness of the student, or other special circumstances, they may submit a SAP Appeal., If the Appeal is approved, a student’s financial aid eligibility may be re-instated.

After being notified by the financial aid office student has 21 days to submit a petition. The appeal must specify why the student failed to maintain SAP and what has changed to allow them to maintain or progress toward making SAP in the future.

Appeals are reviewed by the Financial Aid SAP Appeals Committee and determined on a case-by-case basis. The criteria for approving an appeal will be based on the student’s circumstance, documentation, and a reasonable expectation that the student can reestablish progress toward a degree objective, and regain academic standing that meets the requirements for graduation.

After consulting with the SAP Appeals Committee, the Director of Financial Aid will render a decision and notify the student within 21 days of receipt of the appeal documentation. If a student’s appeal is granted, s/he will be placed on Financial Aid Probation for a semester and granted one semester of financial aid eligibility. At the end of the semester, his/her academic record is re-evaluated to determine if he/she are off of probation and found to be in good standing.

If the student’s Petition is denied by the Financial Aid SAP Appeals Committee, the student may either:

  1. continue enrollment and make payment arrangements with the Student Business Services Office; or
  2. withdraw and submit required documents to corresponding departments as delineated in the withdrawal policy.

FA Funding/Reinstatement Rules following a SAP Appeal:
A student cannot be paid for any payment period in which an academic progress standard was not met. If a student fails to meet SAP policy at the beginning of an academic year but meets it later by evidence of sufficient documentation, the following rule applies:

For Federal, State, campus-based, aid types may be paid only for the payment period in which he/she regains progress. No retroactive disbursements are allowed.

http://policy.csuci.edu/statements/statement-federal-state-financial-aid-policies.pdf 

Return of Title IV Funds

Accountability

Financial Aid office

Applicability

All registered students at CI receiving financial aid assistance.

Policy

Treatment of Title IV Aid When a Student Withdraws
When a student completely withdraws from the University, the Financial Aid office determines the percentage of Title IV funds to be returned and informs Student Business Services. Institutions are required to determine the percentage of Title IV aid “earned” by the student and to return the unearned portion to the appropriate aid program. This percentage is determined by the percentage of the enrollment period completed by the student, as outlined below.

  • Determine the percentage of the enrollment period completed by the student.
    • Days Attended ÷ Days in Enrollment Period = Percentage Completed
    • If the calculated percentage exceeds 60%, then the student has “earned” all Title IV aid for the enrollment period.
  • Apply the percentage completed to the Title IV aid awarded to determine the student’s eligibility for aid prior to the withdrawal.
    • Total Aid Disbursed x Percentage Completed = Earned Aid
  • Determine the amount of unearned aid to be returned to the appropriate Title IV aid program.
    • Total Disbursed Aid - Earned Aid = Unearned Aid to be Returned
    • If the aid already disbursed equals the earned aid, no further action is required. If the aid already disbursed is less than the earned aid, a late disbursement will be made to the student. If the aid already disbursed is greater than the earned aid, the difference must be returned to the appropriate Title IV aid program.
  • Distribute the responsibility to return funds between the institution and the student.
    • The Financial Aid office will follow Federal regulations to determine the proportions of aid disbursed that must be returned by the institution and by the student. Both loan and grant funds must be returned. The amount of aid the student is responsible for returning will be reflected on the University bill. The student’s portion of grant funds to be returned is reduced by 50%, per Federal regulations. Any refund or repayment obligation will be clearly outlined for the student in writing and will appear on the University bill.
  • Return the Title IV aid, based on the type of aid disbursed, in the following order:
    1. Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan
    2. Federal (Subsidized) Stafford Loan
    3. (Federal Perkins Loan) CI does not participate in this program.
    4. Federal PLUS Loan (Parent and Graduate PLUS)
    5. Federal Pell Grant
    6. Federal SEOG

The complete statement on Federal and State Financial Aid Policies and Procedures can be found on the CI website.

Grades, Honors and Awards

Course Grade Appeals

  1. Each student has the right to appeal the final course grade, but only the final course grade. For example, a student may not appeal grades on individual assignments and/or examinations.
  2. Appeals are limited to situations in which the student believes the grade was “prejudicially”, “capriciously”, or “arbitrarily” assigned.
  3. The appeal must be initiated within the first seven weeks of the first regular semester after assignment of the grade*(See item 6 below). A student who believes that a course grade has been assigned inappropriately must follow the proper steps in the appeal process, observing the time limits for completion of the steps as follows:

    Step 1: The grade appeal must first be directed to the instructor of the course, in writing by the end of the seventh week of the semester and copied to the Chair. If the grade is not correct, the instructor can change the grade with a change of grade form. The instructor has two weeks to respond to the student’s request in writing and copied to the Chair. Students who file after the fifth week may not have their appeals settled by the end of the semester.

    Step 2: If the grade is correct and the student is not satisfied with the instructor’s explanation, and intends to appeal the grade, the student must make an appointment to speak with the program chair. If the instructor is not available or does not respond to the student’s appeal within the given time frame, the Program Chair may act on behalf of the instructor. If the program chair is the instructor, the student should speak with the Vice President of Academic Affairs (or designee). The program chair or Vice President of Academic Affairs (or designee) cannot change the grade, but will then discuss the issue with the instructor and provide a response by the end of the ninth week of the semester to the student.

    Step 3: If the student is not satisfied after receiving the response from the appropriate administrator, the student should submit a written appeal by the end of the eleventh week of the semester to the University Appeals Committee through the office of Academic Affairs.

    Step 4: The University Appeals Committee will forward the student’s statement to the instructor. The instructor will be required to respond in writing by a specified date within the semester. The student’s statement and the instructor’s response will be reviewed by the entire committee, after which the committee can:

               a. Request more information from the student and/ or the instructor

               b. Decide to change or maintain the grade

    Step 5: When the committee has made its decision, it will notify the student and instructor in writing and the student will be given a copy of the instructor’s written response by the end of the semester.
  4. The University Appeals committee shall consist of faculty and at least one student.
  5. Individuals may not participate as a member of the University Appeals Committee in review of an appeal if they are a participant in the appeal. The decision of the University Appeals Committee is final.
  6. If a student is a candidate for graduation, the office of the registrar must be notified in writing of the intent to appeal the grade, within 30 days of the last day of the semester. The final degree evaluation will not be performed and the degree will not be granted until the grade appeal process has been completed.
  7. No grades can be appealed or changed for any reason after a degree has been granted.

** When the basis of a grade appeal is alleged conduct that constitutes discrimination, then: a) the appeal will be referred to the Complaint Procedure for investigation and determination of whether discrimination occurred; b) when discrimination is determined to have occurred and the remedy includes a potential grade change, then the decision regarding whether and how to change the grade will be made jointly by the University Appeals Committee and the Appropriate Administrator (if the complaint is against a non-student) or the Judicial Officer or Hearing Officer(if the complaint is against a student); and c) the filing of a grade appeal will not postpone or suspend an investigation and discrimination determination under the Complaint Procedure.

(SP05-09)

Course Repeat / Grade Forgiveness 

The Course Repeat Policy, formerly the Forgiveness of Previously Earned Grade Policy (SP 12-02), may be used only by undergraduate students. It may not be used by graduate/post-baccalaureate students working on master’s degrees, graduate certificates, or teaching credentials, or by unclassified post-baccalaureate students, even when they might take undergraduate courses. This policy is applied only to courses taken at CSU Channel Islands and repeated at CSU Channel Islands. Students may repeat courses only if they earned grades lower than a “C,” e.g. grades of “WU,” “F,” “D-, “D,” “D+,” “C-,” “NC” or “IC.”

Course Repeats with Grade Forgiveness

  1. Undergraduate students may repeat up to a total of sixteen (16) semester units taken at CSU Channel Islands for forgiveness.
  2. Undergraduate students may repeat an individual course for grade forgiveness only once.
  3. If the second grade is equal to or higher than the first, then it replaces the first grade. If the second grade is lesser than the first, the original grade will remain in the grade point average. In either case, the course repetition limit will have been met, and the units will apply towards the total unit limit for forgiveness.
  4. Grade forgiveness shall not be applicable to courses for which the original grade was the result of a finding of academic dishonesty.

Course Repeats with Grade Averaging

  1. Beyond the 16 semester units that can be repeated for grade forgiveness, students may repeat an additional 12 semester units for grade averaging. In such instances the repeat grade shall not replace the original grade; instead, both grades shall be calculated into the student’s overall grade point average.

(SP17-04)

Grades

  1. The “ABCDF” is the default grading system. Although it is not required, individual faculty members may add a “+” or “-” to any grade except “F”. By adding a “+” to a grade, the grade points earned shall increase by 0.3 (except that an A+ shall still be 4.0 grade points). By adding a “-” to a grade, the grade points earned shall decrease by 0.3. Course syllabi are required to state clearly whether “+/-” grading is used. The standard grade points per letter grade are as follows:
  • The grade of “A” is equivalent to 4.0 points of a four-point scale
  • The grade of “B” is equivalent to 3.0 points of a four-point scale
  • The grade of “C” is equivalent to 2.0 points of a four-point scale
  • The grade of “D” is equivalent to 1.0 point of a four-point scale
  • The grade of “F” is equivalent to 0 (zero) points of a four-point scale
  • A student may take a course “CR/NC” if the course is designated as allowing “CR/NC” grading in the course approval process

     2. A student may take a course “CR/NC” if the course is designated as allowing “CR/NC” grading in the course approval process

     3. Not more than 12 units of general education courses may be taken “CR/NC”.

     4. The decision on how many units of courses taken “CR/NC” and which courses can be taken “CR/NC” is left up to each individual program.

     5. Course syllabi shall include a discussion of the instructor’s grading policy.

     6. The level of student performance and course grades are determined by the instructor of record.

 

(SP12-07)

Grading Symbols Assigned, Other

RP (Report in Progress) The “RP” symbol is used in connection with courses that extend beyond one academic term. It indicates that work is in progress, but that the assignment of a final grade must await completion of additional work. Work is to be completed within one year except for graduate degree theses.

W (Withdrawal) The “W” symbol indicates that the student was permitted to withdraw from the course after the third week of the semester with the approval of the instructor and appropriate campus officials. It carries no connotation of quality of student performance and is not used in calculating grade point average. See withdrawal procedures in the Catalog.

WU (Withdrawal Unauthorized) The “WU” symbol indicates that an enrolled student did not formally withdraw from the course according to University policy and also failed to complete course requirements. It is used when, in the opinion of the instructor, completed assignments or course activities or both were insufficient to make normal evaluation of academic performance possible. For purposes of grade point average, this symbol is equivalent to an “F.”

Incomplete Grade Policy

An “Incomplete Authorized” (I) signifies that a portion of required course work has not been completed and evaluated in the prescribed time period due to unforeseen, but fully justified reasons and that there is still a possibility of earning credit. After the request of the student for the “I” grade, the faculty member makes the decision as to whether or not an “I” grade is issued. If an “I” grade is issued, the faculty member determines what conditions must be met for the “I” to be removed. However, to protect both students and faculty, it is necessary that there be a written record of the conditions. Thus, if there is a later disagreement, or if the instructor is no longer available, the “I” can still be handled by the program. The Request for an Incomplete form which is to be used for writing the conditions mentioned above is available in the program administrative support offices. This form shall include a statement of:

  1. The work not completed and the percentage that each uncompleted assignment will count toward the final grade;
    and
  2. The final grade the instructor will assign if the course requirements are not completed within one calendar year, or a shorter period as specified on the form, immediately following the term in which the “I” was assigned, without respect to continuous enrollment of the student during this period.

A copy of the agreement is to be given to the student and a copy is to be retained in the program office. The completed forms are filed in the program office. The awarding of an “I” requires prior consultation with the student. The student has the responsibility to confer with the faculty member to learn the requirements for removal of the “I”. At that time the student is given a copy of the form detailing the conditions to be met. An “I” must be made up within the time period set forth by the instructor with a maximum allowable time span of one calendar year immediately following the end of the term in which it was assigned. This limitation prevails whether or not the student maintains continuous enrollment. Failure to complete the assigned work will result in an “I” being converted to an “IC” symbol, unless the faculty member assigns a specific letter grade at the time the Incomplete is assigned, which would replace the “I” in the student’s record at the end of the calendar year deadline. The “IC” is counted as a failing grade equivalent to an “F” for grade point average and progress point computation. Although the one-year maximum for incomplete grades will be the general university policy, Executive Order 171 specifies that exceptions can be made in special cases, such as military service and serious health problems. An extension of an “I” grade in any one course shall be allowed only one time, for a maximum total extension of one year. An “I” may not be changed to a passing grade as the result of re-enrolling in the course. In cases where repetition of the course is appropriate, the student will be assigned a withdrawal or failing grade rather than an “I” grade. A failing grade is not an acceptable reason to request or grant an incomplete grade. If a student subsequently completes a course that is recorded as incomplete on a transcript from another institution, it is the student’s responsibility to submit a corrected official transcript and advise the Admissions and Recruitment office that he/she wishes to receive credit.

(SP03-18)

Mission-Based Awards

All graduating CI students are eligible to apply for one or more of these awards during the year of their graduation. These awards are based on the CI mission statement and honor those students who exemplify the values of CI as stated in the mission statement.

Each of the following awards will be granted to one graduate per year, and no student shall be awarded more than one of these awards. The selection committee may also elect to not give an award for a given year.

Students applying for these awards are expected to state how they have exemplified the educational outcomes and approaches outlined in the mission, either through exceptional curricular activity, and/or through extra-curricular activity while a student at CI.

Each year a selection committee will be appointed by the Provost. In consultation with the faculty, all mission-based centers, and others in the campus community, the committee will make and distribute applications stating specific criteria for each award, review the applicants’ submissions, and select recipients of these awards in accordance with the guidelines.

Outstanding Integrative Approaches Award

Granted to a student who exemplifies an education marked by integrative approaches from more than one discipline.

Outstanding Experiential and Service Learning Award

Granted to a student who exemplifies an education marked by experiential and service learning.

Outstanding Multicultural Perspectives Award

Granted to a student who demonstrates a widening of multicultural perspectives.

Outstanding International Perspectives Award

Granted to a student who demonstrates a widening of international perspectives.

(SP04-22)

Program Honors

Program honors will be awarded [to student graduating from CI] based on criteria developed by individual programs.

(SP03-24)

Semester Honors

CI undergraduate students completing 12 or more units with a letter grade in a single semester or completing 12 or more units with a letter grade in one academic year assessed at the end of the spring semester, shall be named to the Semester Honors list if they earn a 3.75 or higher grade point average.

(SP03-19)

University Honors

      To receive honors at graduation at CSU Channel Islands, a student must:

1. Complete a minimum 30 units of courses taken at CSUCI for a letter grade.;

2. Earn a grade point average of3.50 or above in all work taken at CSUCI.

3. Earn the following cumulative grade point average in all undergraduate courses, including transfer work:

  • Summa Cum Lauge - this honor is awarded to all students who earn a grade point average of 3.90 - 4.0.
  • Magna Cum Laude - this honor is awarded to all students who earn a grade point average of 3.75 - 3.89.
  • Cum Laude - this honor is awarded to all students who earn a grade point average of 3.50 - 3.74. 

(SP03-24)

Internships and Service Learning

Internships

The following policies will pertain to all courses or programs designated as academic internships.

  1. Definition

    Internships integrate the students’ academic study with practical experience in cooperating organizations. Through the integration of practical and academic experience, students enhance their academic knowledge in their area of study, their personal development, and their professional preparation. The teaching faculty and the on-site supervisors share in the educational process of interns.

    Any academic department/program/unit/faculty can develop their appropriate guidelines and procedures and structure regarding internships. However, for the purposes of legally minimizing the risk of liability and ensuring a safe and effective internship program for the University, students, faculty and partner organizations, the following policy should be incorporated into any university-related internship program.
     
  2. All internships should
    1. Include a signed agreement with a senior representative of the partner agency or corporation and the University procurement officer as designated signature authority. In this agreement, it must be stated that the university assumes no risk or liability and that the sponsoring agency/corporation assumes full responsibility for the liability of the intern, affirming that they have requisite insurance to cover any potential harm to the intern, and include basic information such as location, contact person, and organization description.
    2. Include a learning agreement signed by the student, sponsoring faculty, and placement supervisor listing the learning goals of the internship and the duties and responsibilities of each party, notifying the student of the assignment of liability, terms and conditions and the listing of relevant agency policies, and the date the internship begins. This includes mention of whether the intern is paid and conditions for receiving academic credit.

Faculty and/or programs must maintain a file of the aforementioned signed forms. The Dean of Faculty will also retain a sample copy of internship forms that are used.

*This requirement is pursuant to Executive order 849, page 6: “Student placement agreements must be in writing and shall specify minimum insurance requirements applicable to the contracting parties and appropriate hold harmless provisions based upon the needs of the contracting parties. The following hold harmless provisions may be used as a minimum:

Hold Harmless Provision: CI shall be responsible for damages caused by the negligence of its officers, employees and agents. Trustees shall be responsible for the damages caused by the negligence of its officers, employee and agents. The intent of this paragraph is to impose responsibility on each part for the negligence of its officer’s employees and agents.

(SP03-17)

Service Learning Policy

The complete policy text can be found on the CI website http://senate.csuci.edu/policies.htm.

(SP03-16)

Records & Registration

Academic Leave

Students who take a one semester leave of absence from CI are considered continuing students and do not need to take any action prior to registration. Any student in good academic standing may apply to take a leave of absence from the university for up to four consecutive semesters. While a student may apply for multiple leaves, no student will be permitted more than six total semesters of leave from CI. Academic Leave Forms are available at the Records and Registration office.

(SP03-06)

Academic Load

A student’s academic load is determined by the number of units enrolled each semester.

Undergraduate Full-Time 12 + units
Undergraduate Part-Time 6 units
Graduate Full-Time 9 units
Graduate Part-Time 4 units

Academic Probation and Disqualification

This CI policy does not supersede additional policies or procedures mandated by Chancellor’s Executive Order 823.

Academic Probation

An undergraduate student is subject to academic probation if at any time the cumulative grade point average (GPA) in all college work attempted or the cumulative GPA at CSUCI falls below 2.0.  Probationary students will be advised of their status at the end of the semester.  The communication will include conditions for removal from probation and the circumstances that would lead to disqualification.  All probationary students are required to receive academic advising no later than the second week of the following semester.  Students shall be removed from academic probation once they have received such advising and both the cumulative GPA in all college work attempted and the cumulative GPA average at CSUCI are at least 2.0 or higher.

(SP04-33)

A post-baccalaureate student will be subject to academic probation if, after attempting 12 or more graded units, his or her post-baccalaureate cumulative GPA for units attempted at CI falls below a 2.50 average. The GPA will determine whether a student is subject to probation only when the student has attempted 12 semester units. A student enrolled in a graduate degree program in either conditionally classified or classified standing shall be subject to academic probation if he or she fails to maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 in all units attempted; no course in which the student receives lower than a C may be counted toward a Master’s degree.

(SP02-04)

Academic Disqualification

An undergraduate student on academic probation during the current semester or any preceding semester at CSUCI will be academically disqualified when the student’s GPA in all units attempted or in all units attempted at CSUCI falls below the following: as a freshman, 1.50; as a sophomore, 1.70; as a junior,1.85; as a senior, 1.95.

A student seeking a second baccalaureate will be academically disqualified when the student’s GPA after twelve attempted units at CSUCI falls below 2.0.

A conditionally classified or classified graduate student will be academically disqualified when the student’s GPA in all units attempted for the current program falls below 2.5. The student’s GPA in a previous graduate program will not count toward the student’s GPA in the current program, regardless of whether that previous graduate program was at CSUCI or elsewhere. The student’s GPA in prerequisite courses taken post-baccalaureate and as a condition of the student’s admission into the program will count toward the GPA in all units attempted for the current program.

All students’ records will be evaluated for disqualification at the end of each semester. Students cannot be placed on probation for the first time at CSUCI and be disqualified in the same semester. However, students who have previously been on probation at CSUCI and fall below the GPA listed above will be academically disqualified, even if the probation and disqualification semesters are non-consecutive. A student may appeal disqualification no later than the Academic Appeals Board deadline before the start of the semester following the disqualification. Appeals should be made to the Office of the Provost or Designee. Appeals will be decided by the Academic Appeals Board. Typical grounds for a successful appeal include significant improvement towards meeting the GPA requirements and/or extraordinary circumstances beyond the student’s control, as determined by the Academic Appeals Board. A successful petition of appeal for disqualification will result in the student remaining on academic probation. Students who appeal unsuccessfully will need to apply for reinstatement as specified in the Policy on Reinstatement if they wish to continue at CSUCI.

(SP14-09)

Administrative-Academic Probation

An undergraduate or graduate student may be placed on administrative-academic probation for any of the following reasons:

  • Withdrawal from more than half the units in which a student is enrolled in two successive semesters or in any three semesters (withdrawals directly associated with a medical condition are not included);
  • Repeated failure to progress toward the stated degree objective; or
  • Failure to comply, after due notice, with an academic requirement or regulation.

Probationary students will be advised of their status by letter at the end of the semester. The letter will include conditions for removal from probation and the circumstances that would lead to disqualification.

Administrative-Academic Disqualification

A student who has been placed on administrative-academic probation may be disqualified if:

  • The conditions for removal of academic-administrative probation are not met within the specified period;
  • The student becomes subject to academic probation while on administrative-academic probation; and
  • The student becomes subject to administrative-academic probation for the same or similar reason to a previous placement on academic-administrative probation, although not currently in such status.

When such action is taken, the student will receive written notification including an explanation of the basis for the action and the process for appeal.

(SP02-04)

Reinstatement

In order to be considered for reinstatement to CI, a disqualified student must demonstrate academic ability by completing additional coursework. All classes taken must be applicable for degree credit at CI. After eliminating the grade-point deficiency, the student may petition the Academic Appeals Board for reinstatement. The student must submit the petition for reinstatement no later than three weeks before the beginning of the semester that the student intends to return. The Academic Appeals Board will only consider the petition for reinstatement of students who have remained outside of the university for at least one regular (Fall or Spring) semester after their dismissal. Students who are disqualified, reinstated, and become disqualified a second time will not be granted a second reinstatement.

(SP15-10)

Add Policy

  1. Students may add courses during the first three weeks of classes using permission numbers obtained from the instructor.
  2. Additions to a student’s schedule requiring a Time Conflict form or Additional Unit Authorization will always require the use of the paper form.
  3. After the third week of instruction a student may request permission to add a class with the approval of the instructor, the program chair, and the Vice President for Academic Affairs (or designee), as indicated by their signatures on the appropriate form.
  4. Students are not permitted to add a class after the fourth week of instruction. Exceptions may be made only in case of extenuating circumstances outside the control of the student and when the student has been attending the course and is current with all coursework. The signatures in item 3 are required. 

(SP13-03)

Cancellation of Registration or Withdrawal from the Institution

Students who find it necessary to cancel their registration or to withdraw from all classes after enrolling for any academic term are required to follow the University’s official withdrawal procedures. Failure to follow formal University procedures may result in an obligation to pay fees as well as the assignment of failing grades in all courses and the need to apply for readmission before being permitted to enroll in another academic term. Information on canceling registration and withdrawal procedures is available from Records & Registration, (805) 437-8500.

Students who receive financial aid funds must consult with the Financial Aid office prior to withdrawing from the University regarding any required return or repayment of grant or loan assistance received for that academic term or payment period. If a recipient of student financial aid funds withdraws from the institution during an academic term or a payment period, the amount of grant or loan assistance received may be subject to return and/or repayment provisions.

For more information see Withdrawal from Courses policy and section entitled Schedule of Fees  for refund information.

Catalog Rights

Undergraduate students remaining in attendance in regular sessions at a California State University campus, a California community college, or any combination of these institutions, may for the purposes of meeting all graduation requirements elect to meet the requirements in effect at CI either: (1) at the time the student began attendance, or (2) at the time of entrance to CI, or (3) at the time of graduation from CI.

If while enrolled the student declares or changes the major, a major option, or a minor, the student shall follow the requirements either in effect at the time of the declaration or change, or in effect at the time of graduation. Other catalog years may be approved by department petition. Students do not lose catalog rights for GE and other graduation requirements by declaring or changing their major, if they maintain continuous attendance.

(SP08-07)

Changing Basis for Grading

If either traditional letter grading or credit/no credit grading is allowed for a course, a student may change the basis for grading from traditional letter grading to credit/no credit grading, or vice versa, through the eighth week of instruction without instructor approval. Grade basis changes will follow appropriate procedures and are permitted only when the program area for the course and the student’s major do not require a specific grading option for the course.

(SP 17-03)

Class Attendance

  1. Students are expected to attend class regularly.
  2. Instructors must include their class attendance requirements in the course syllabus.
  3. If students have a valid reason to miss class (excused absence), they are responsible for informing their instructors of the absence at the earliest possible date (preferably before class if possible). Instructors may require students to provide documentation for excused absences. Excused absences include, but are not limited to:
    1. Illness or injury to the student
    2. Death, injury, or serious illness of an immediate family member
    3. Religious reasons (California Education Code section 89320)
    4. Jury duty or government obligation
    5. University sanctioned or approved activities (examples include: artistic performances, forensics presentations, participation in research conferences, intercollegiate athletic activities, student government, required class field trips, etc.)
  4. It is the responsibility of the student to give advance notification, contact the instructor to make arrangements to make up any academic work that may be missed, submit assignments on time, and make arrangements regarding activities, tests, quizzes, or exams that may be scheduled during the absences.
  5. If a student does not notify the instructor one week in advance of the dates of excused absences, the instructor is not required to adjust the class schedule or to allow for make-up activities, tests, or exams. However, students shall not be penalized for excused absences when circumstances make it impossible to provide advance notice (e.g. student is engaged in a University sanctioned event such as a playoff game that cannot be anticipated).
  6. Students who expect to be absent from the University for any valid reason, and who have found it difficult to inform their instructors, should notify the Division of Academic Affairs. The Division of Academic Affairs shall notify the student’s instructors of the nature and duration of the absence. It remains the responsibility of the student to arrange with instructors to make up any academic work.
  7. In circumstances where an actual assignment, some specific class work, an activity, a quiz, or an exam cannot reasonably be made up, it is the instructor’s option to assign alternative work.
  8. Instructors are not obligated to consider other absences as excused.

(SP01-56)

Class Standing

Freshmen 0 - 29 units
Sophomore 30 - 59 units
Junior 60 - 89 units
Senior 90 + units

Course Load for Undergraduate Students

  1. An undergraduate student in good academic standing may enroll in up to 18 units without advisor approval.
  2. An undergraduate student on academic probation may enroll in up to 14 units without advisor approval.
  3. Undergraduate students in good academic standing who wish to enroll in more than 18 units are required to have

a. written approval from the chair or a faculty advisor in the student’s declared major, as specified by the major program,

or

b. if the student has not yet declared a major, written approval from an academic advisor 

     4. Program chairs will be notified of decisions made by academic advisors within 1 business day for students in their major and chairs will retain the authority to override these decisions. 

          a. Programs may coordinate with Academic Advising regarding specific guidelines for approving excess units.

      5.  Undergraduate students on academic probation who wish to enroll in more than 14 units are required to have an academic advisor’s written approval.

(SP17-10)

Course Time Conflict

Students may not enroll in classes that conflict in time. If the faculty members involved believe a student may participate fully and attend two classes that conflict in time in the schedule, the student must obtain the signature of both instructors for these classes on the Time Conflict form, and state the reasons why this is possible.

(SP04-30)

Credit Hour

As of July 1, 2011 federal law (600.2 and 600.4) requires all accredited institutions to comply with the federal definition of the credit hour. For all CSU degree programs and courses bearing academic credit, the “credit hour” is defined as “the amount of work represented in intended learning outcomes and verified by evidence of student achievement that is an institutionally established equivalency that reasonably approximates not less than:

  1. One hour of classroom or direct faculty instruction and a minimum of two hours of out-of-class student work each week for approximately fifteen weeks for one semester or trimester hour of credit, or ten to twelve weeks for one quarter hour of credit, or the equivalent amount of work over a different amount of time; or
  2. At least an equivalent amount of work as required in paragraph (1) of this definition for other academic activities as established by the institution, including laboratory work, internships, practica, studio work, and other academic work leading to the award of credit hours.”

A credit hour is assumed to be a 50-minute period. In courses, in which “seat time” does not apply, a credit hour may be measured by an equivalent amount of work, as demonstrated by student achievement.

Declaration of Majors

To help ensure timely completion of graduation requirements, students who have a total of 60 units completed and in progress must have declared a major before they may register for the next term. Upper division transfer students are required to declare their intended major on their application for admission.

(SP02-06)

Double-Counting of Course Requirements

A course may meet the requirements for two or more program areas (majors, minors, and other sub-programs) if the coordinators for those program areas agree; however, the units for the course are counted only once toward the total units for graduation. Double counting between a program and General Education requirements is also allowed.

Policy on Issuing Official CSU Channel Islands Transcripts

The complete policy text can be found on the CI website.

(AA.12.004)  

Multiple Majors

Students may declare more than one major. If all majors completed lead to the same degree, BA or BS, they will all appear on the diploma. If the majors lead to different degrees, the policy on double degrees applies. Double counting of courses shall conform to the policy in Senate Resolution 34-01.

(SP02-08)

Priority Registration for Students with Disabilities

The complete policy text can be found on the CI website.   

(SA.08.002)

Second Baccalaureate Degree

Students seeking a second or subsequent baccalaureate degree must satisfy all requirements for the degree. However, as post-baccalaureate students, they are also subject to additional requirements.

To be eligible for admission as a second baccalaureate degree candidate, students must:

  1. hold a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution.
  2. have a minimum grade point average of 2.50 in their last 60 semester units (or 90 quarter units).

Degree Requirements

  • Students must satisfy all requirements for the degree, including any current General Education requirements/ graduation requirements not previously met.
  • Students must meet all applicable Title V requirements.
  • Students must satisfy the Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement.
  • Students must complete requirements in a discipline in which no degree has previously been granted. Courses previously applied to another degree may be used to satisfy content requirements, but cannot be used to satisfy unit requirements of the post-baccalaureate degree.
  • Students must complete a minimum of 30 units in residence, including 24 units in upper division courses, which includes 12 units in the major.
  • Students must maintain at least a 2.00 grade point average in all courses taken to remain in good academic standing.
  • Students are not eligible for University honors, but may be eligible for major program or other honors.
  • Programs must approve all course work used to satisfy major degree requirements

In addition

  • Courses taken as part of a second baccalaureate degree cannot be utilized to meet graduate degree requirements.
  • Academic Programs may enforce specific time limits on courses taken prior to the second or subsequent degree.
  • Excess course credit not used in the primary degree may be utilized in the second or subsequent degree. Specific courses may be waived and other courses substituted.

(SP06-19)

Substitution of Courses

Students who have taken a required course in their major/minor at a college or university other than CI must petition to receive major/minor credit for this course. The Course Substitution of Major or Minor Requirements for Bachelor’s Degree is available in the Records and Registration office and the Advising Center. Petitions are also available for Request for Course Substitution: General Education/Graduation Requirements and Petition for Exception to a University Policy or Deadline. A photocopy of the course syllabus or catalog course description is required for each course being petitioned. Please note: a final grade of “C” or better is required for the language and multicultural graduation requirements. Advisors in the Advising Center can assist students in completing course substitution petitions. Once completed, all petitions must be submitted to the Records and Registration office, which will then route the petition to the appropriate Faculty Major Advisor, Academic Coordinator, or Committee (GE or Curriculum) for review. A copy of the petition with the determination will be emailed to the student and the original form will be kept in the student’s file in the Records and Registration office.

Wait List Policy

Prior to the start of classes, students wishing to enroll in a closed course may choose to be added to a wait list. Wait listed students will be automatically enrolled in the course as space becomes available. At the instructor’s discretion, students may be added to the course after the start of classes.

(SP03-20)

Waiver of Course Requirement

In addition, students who believe that previous training has sufficiently prepared them in a certain area may request a waiver of a specific course requirement (subject credit only). A waiver of specific course requirements does not reduce the total number of credits required for the major or the degree nor does it reduce the residence requirement.

(SP01-37)

Withdrawal from Courses

1. Undergraduate students may withdraw from no more than 18 semester-units.

2. Students may drop courses through the relevant published deadline without instructor permission. The published deadlines will correspond to 20% of the instructional time for the course.

3. After approximately 20% of instructional time and until 80% of instructional time has elapsed, withdrawal from courses is permissible only for serious and compelling reasons. Approval signatures from the instructor and program chairs must be obtained to withdraw during this period. The withdrawal will be noted as a “W” on the student’s permanent record.

 

a. For courses on a 16-week schedule, 20% and 80% of instructional time correspond to the ends of the 3rd week and the 12th week of classes, respectively.

b. For courses on a 12-week schedule, 20% and 80% of instructional time will be rounded up to correspond to the ends of the 3rd week and the 10th week of classes, respectively.

c. For courses on a 10-week schedule, 20% and 80% of instructional time correspond to the ends of the 2nd week and the 8th week of classes, respectively.

d. For courses on an 8-week or other length schedules, 20% and 80% of instructional time will be calculated using actual days of instruction by the office(s) publishing the calendar.

 

4. Students wishing to drop courses after the published deadline must comply with the Criteria for “Serious and Compelling Reasons.”

5. After 80% of instructional time has elapsed, withdrawal is not permitted except in cases beyond the student’s control such as accident or serious illness where the assignment of an Incomplete is not practical. Approval signatures from the instructor, program chair and Vice President for Academic Affairs (or designee) must be obtained. Withdrawal in this category will typically involve total withdrawal from the University and will be noted as a “W” on the student’s permanent record. Such withdrawals will not count against the maximums provided for in item 1 above.

6. Instructor Initiated Withdrawal: Instructors may drop students through the relevant published deadline for adding/ dropping classes and as early as the first day of classes for any the following reasons:

a. Student failure to attend class without having made prior arrangements with the instructor.

b. Student failure to complete the prerequisites for a course before enrolling in the course.

c. Student failure to properly secure the permission of the instructor before enrolling when such permission is required.

(SP13-10)

Rights and Responsibilities of Individuals

Campus Safety and Environment

Campus Violence

The complete policy text can be found on the CI website.

(FA.31.011)

Driving and Parking on Campus Property

The complete policy text can be found on the CI website.

(FA.81.003)

Motor Vehicle Use

The complete policy text can be found on the CI website.

(FA.43.002)

Nondiscrimination for Students

The complete statement on Title IX Notice of Non-Discrimination can be found on the CI website.

Smoking on Campus

The complete statement on Systemwide Smoke and Tobacco Free Environment can be found on the CI website.

 

 

General

Academic Freedom

Be it resolved that the Academic Senate of CI affirms its commitment to upholding and preserving the principles of academic freedom: the right of faculty to teach, conduct research or other scholarship, and publish free of external constraints other than those normally denoted by the scholarly standards of a discipline, and

Be it further resolved that the Academic Senate of CI fully endorses the 1940 Statement of Principles on Academic Freedom and Tenure of the AAUP www.aaup.org, and

Be it further resolved that this campus is dedicated to fostering the free speech rights guaranteed by the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution and to ensure that guests on campus have full opportunity to the exercise of these rights; and

Be it further resolved that the Academic Senate of CI calls on the university community to maintain our campus as an open forum for free expression of ideas and diverse views in the framework of scholarly inquiry and professional ethics; and

Be it further resolved that the Academic Senate of CI affirms its intent to help ensure that all relevant policies developed on this campus protect freedom of inquiry, research, expression, and teaching both inside the classroom and beyond, and

Be it finally resolved that the Academic Senate of CI opposes any system or campus policy that would restrict academic freedom in the name of “security” or a “balanced approach” to controversial issues.

(SR03-05)

Career Placement

The Institutional Research, Planning and Effectiveness office may furnish, upon request, information about the employment of students who graduate from programs or courses of study preparing students for a particular career field. Any such data provided must be in a form that does not allow for the identification of any individual student. This information includes data concerning the average starting salary and the percentage of previously enrolled students who obtained employment. The information may include data collected from either graduates of the campus or graduates of all campuses in the California State University system.

Communication with Students

The complete policy text can be found on the CI website.

(SA.07.012)

Death of a Student

The complete policy text can be found on the CI website.

(SA.01.002)

Degrees Awarded Posthumously

The complete policy text can be found on the CI website.

(SP10-13)

Disposition of Fees: Campus Emergency; Interim Suspension

Title 5, California Code of Regulations, § 41302

During periods of campus emergency, as determined by the President of the individual campus, the President may, after consultation with the Chancellor, place into immediate effect any emergency regulations, procedures, and other measures deemed necessary or appropriate to meet the emergency, safeguard persons and property, and maintain educational activities.

The President of the campus may place on probation, suspend, or expel a student for one or more of the causes enumerated in Section 41301. No fees or tuition paid by or for such student for the semester, quarter, or summer session in which he or she is suspended or expelled shall be refunded. If the student is readmitted before the close of the semester, quarter, or summer session in which he or she is suspended, no additional tuition or fees shall be required of the student on account of the suspension.

The President may immediately impose an interim suspension in all cases in which there is reasonable cause to believe that such an immediate suspension is required in order to protect lives or property and to insure the maintenance of order. A student so placed on interim suspension shall be given prompt notice of charges and the opportunity for a hearing within 10 days of the imposition of interim suspension. During the period of interim suspension, the student shall not, without prior written permission of the President or designated representative, enter any campus of the California State University other than to attend the hearing. Violation of any condition of interim suspension shall be grounds for expulsion.

Immigration Requirements for Licensure

The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (P.L. 104-193), also known as the Welfare Reform Act, includes provisions to eliminate eligibility for federal and state public benefits for certain categories of lawful immigrants as well as benefits for all illegal immigrants.

Students who will require a professional or commercial license provided by a local, state, or federal government agency in order to engage in an occupation for which the CSU may be training them must meet the immigration requirements of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act to achieve licensure. Information concerning the regulation these requirements are available from Human Resources, (805) 437-8490.

Intellectual Property

The complete policy text can be found on the CI website.

(SP08-04 / AA.01.002)

Student Organizations, Eligibility Requirements for Membership

The complete policy text can be found on the CI website.

(SA.21.004)

Student Involvement on Campus During Finals & Pre-Finals Week

The complete policy text can be found on the CI website.

(SA.18.001)

Student Conduct & Health

Academic Dishonesty

  1. Academic dishonesty includes but is not limited to such things as cheating, inventing false information or citations, plagiarism, and helping someone else commit an act of academic dishonesty. It usually involves an attempt by a student to show possession of a level of knowledge or skill that he/she does not possess.
  2. Course instructors have the initial responsibility for detecting and dealing with academic dishonesty. Instructors who believe that an act of academic dishonesty has occurred are obligated to discuss the matter with the student(s) involved. Instructors should possess reasonable evidence of academic dishonesty. However, if circumstances prevent consultation with student(s), instructors may take whatever action (subject to student appeal) they deem appropriate.
  3. Instructors who are convinced by the evidence that a student is guilty of academic dishonesty shall assign an appropriate academic penalty. If the instructors believe that the academic dishonesty reflects on the student’s academic performance or the academic integrity in a course, the student’s grade should be adversely affected. Suggested guidelines for appropriate actions include an oral reprimand in cases where there is reasonable doubt that the student knew his/her action constituted academic dishonesty; a failing grade on the particular paper, project or examination where the act of dishonesty was unpremeditated or where there were significant mitigating circumstances; or a failing grade in the course when the dishonesty was premeditated or planned. Instructors will file incident reports with the Vice Presidents for Academic Affairs and for Student Affairs or their designees. These reports shall include a description of the alleged incident of academic dishonesty, any relevant documentation, and any recommendations for action that the instructor deems appropriate.
  4. The Vice President for Student Affairs shall maintain an Academic Dishonesty File of all cases of academic dishonesty with the appropriate documentation. The Vice President for Student Affairs shall notify Enrollment Management Services whenever a course grade assignment is due to a finding of academic dishonesty.
  5. Student may appeal any actions taken on charges of academic dishonesty through the student judicial process detailed in the University Catalog.

(SP13-06)

Alcohol at CI

The complete policy text can be found on the CI website.  

(SA.03.004)

Animal Control

The complete policy text can be found on the CI website.

(FA.30.002)

Drug-Free Campus and Workplace

The complete policy text can be found on the CI website.

(FA.31.010) 

Honor Code

Academic integrity is the responsibility of all members of the CI community. We, as members of the university community, share equally in the responsibility to ensure that the Honor Code instills self-respect; fosters scholarship and achievement; builds habits of honesty; promotes ethical behavior; inspires mutual fellowship and respect; and confers prestige on CI and members of the university community. All university community members should be familiar with the Honor Code. Students share with faculty and staff the responsibility of sustaining a climate of integrity. These values are to be maintained at all times.

  1. Introduction

    In a university community, there can be no doubt that honor and the pursuit of knowledge are inexorably intertwined.

    An honor system must be believed in, supported, and administered by those who belong to it. Upon enrollment at CI, each student is automatically subject to the provisions of the Honor system. Each student has a duty to become familiar with the Honor Code and the provisions of the Honor system. Ignorance of what constitutes an Honor Code violation cannot be used as a defense in an honor hearing.

    The Honor system at CI does not discriminate based upon race, color, religion, national origin, political affiliation, gender, sexual orientation, age, or disability.

    A faculty or staff member may require examination, paper, and other written or electronically submitted assignment containing the following pledge or similar pledge approved by the faculty or staff member of the students submitting the work: “This work complies with the CI Honor Code.” The pledge shall be signed by the students unless it is submitted electronically, in which case the faculty or staff member may require a different method of proof of a student’s pledge.
     
  2. The Honor Code

    Students shall observe complete honesty in all academic matters. All students are strongly urged to ask their faculty or staff members to clarify what types of conduct are authorized or unauthorized in each course. Violations of the Honor Code include, but are not limited to, taking or attempting to take any of the following actions:
    1. Using unauthorized materials or receiving unauthorized assistance during an examination or in connection with any work done for academic credit. Unauthorized materials may include, but are not limited to, notes, textbooks, previous examinations, exhibits, experiments, papers, or other supplementary items.
    2. Giving false or misleading information regarding an academic matter.
    3. Copying information from another student during an examination.
    4. Rendering unauthorized assistance to another student by knowingly permitting him or her to see or copy all or a portion of an examination or any work to be submitted for academic credit.
    5. Obtaining prior knowledge of examination materials including using copies of previously given examinations obtained from files maintained by various groups and organizations in an unauthorized manner.
    6. Providing or obtaining unauthorized copies of any portion of an examination or other course work.
    7. Using a commercially prepared paper or research project, or submitting for academic credit any work completed by someone else.
    8. Falsifying or attempting to falsify class attendance records for oneself, or for someone else, or having another falsify attendance records on your behalf.
    9. Falsifying material relating to course registration or grades, either for oneself or for someone else.
    10. Falsifying reasons why a student did not attend a required class or take a scheduled examination.
    11. Taking an examination in the place of another student.
    12. Making unauthorized changes in any reported grade or on an official academic report form.
    13. Falsifying data submitted for academic credit.
    14. Collaborating in an unauthorized manner with one or more other students on an examination or any work submitted for academic credit.
    15. Committing the act of plagiarism - the deliberate copying, writing, or presenting as one’s own the information, ideas, or phrasing of another person without proper acknowledgment of the true source.
    16. Using University resources in an academically dishonest manner.
    17. Falsifying evidence, intimidating, or influencing someone in connection with an honor violation investigation, hearing, or appeal.

(SP04-38)

Judicial Affairs

The complete statement text can be found on the CI website. 

Student Conduct

Title 5, California Code of Regulations, §41301. Standards for Student Conduct.

  1. Campus Community Values
    1. The University is committed to maintaining a safe and healthy living and learning environment for students, faculty, and staff. Each member of the campus community should choose behaviors that contribute toward this end. Students are expected to be good citizens and to engage in responsible behaviors that reflect well upon their university, to be civil to one another and to others in the campus community, and contribute positively to student and university life.
  2. Grounds for Student Discipline
    Student behavior that is not consistent with the Student Conduct Code is addressed through an educational process that is designed to promote safety and good citizenship and, when necessary, impose appropriate consequences. The following are the grounds upon which student discipline can be based:
    1. Dishonesty, including:
      1. Cheating, plagiarism, or other forms of academic dishonesty that are intended to gain unfair academic advantage.
      2. Furnishing false information to a University official, faculty member, or campus office.
      3. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of a University document, key, or identification instrument.
      4. Misrepresenting ones’ self to be an authorized agent of the University or one of its auxiliaries.
    2. Unauthorized entry into, presence in, use of, or misuse of University property.
    3. Willful, material and substantial disruption or obstruction of a University-related activity, or any on-campus activity.
    4. Participating in an activity that substantially and materially disrupts the normal operations of the University, or infringes on the rights of members of the University community.
    5. Willful, material and substantial obstruction of the free flow of pedestrian or other traffic, on or leading to campus property or an off-campus University related activity.
    6. Disorderly, lewd, indecent, or obscene behavior at a University related activity, or directed toward a member of the University community.
    7. Conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any person within or related to the University community, including physical abuse, threats, intimidation, harassment, or sexual misconduct.
    8. Hazing, or conspiracy to haze. Hazing is defined as any method of initiation or pre-initiation into a student organization or student body, whether or not the organization or body is officially recognized by an educational institution, which is likely to cause serious bodily injury to any former, current, or prospective student of any school, community college, college, university or other educational institution in this state (Penal Code 245.6), and in addition, any act likely to cause physical harm, personal degradation or disgrace resulting in physical or mental harm, to any former, current, or prospective student of any school, community college, college, university or other educational institution. The term “hazing” does not include customary athletic events or school sanctioned events. Neither the express or implied consent of a victim of hazing, nor the lack of active participation in a particular hazing incident is a defense. Apathy or acquiescence in the presence of hazing is not a neutral act, and is also a violation of this section.
    9. Use, possession, manufacture, or distribution of illegal drugs or drug-related paraphernalia, (except as expressly permitted by law and University regulations) or the misuse of legal pharmaceutical drugs.
    10. Use, possession, manufacture, or distribution of alcoholic beverages (except as expressly permitted by law and University regulations), or public intoxication while on campus or at a University related activity.
    11. Theft of property or services from the University community, or misappropriation of University resources.
    12. Unauthorized destruction, or damage to University property or other property in the University community.
    13. Possession or misuse of firearms or guns, replicas, ammunition, explosives, fireworks, knives, other weapons, or dangerous chemicals (without the prior authorization of the campus president) on campus or at a University related activity.
    14. Unauthorized recording, dissemination, or publication of academic presentations (including handwritten notes) for a commercial purpose.
    15. Misuse of computer facilities or resources, including:
      1. Unauthorized entry into a file, for any purpose.
      2. Unauthorized transfer of a file.
      3. Use of another’s identification or password.
      4. Use of computing facilities, campus network, or other resources to interfere with the work of another member of the University community.
      5. Use of computing facilities and resources to send obscene or intimidating and abusive messages.
      6. Use of computing facilities and resources to interfere with normal University operations.
      7. Use of computing facilities and resources in violation of copyright laws.
      8. Violation of a campus computer use policy.
    16. Violation of any published University policy, rule, regulation or presidential order.
    17. Failure to comply with directions or interference with any University official or any public safety officer while acting in the performance of his/her duties.
    18. Any act chargeable as a violation of a federal, state, or local law that poses a substantial threat to the safety or well being of members of the University community, to property within the University community or poses a significant threat of disruption or interference with University operations.
    19. Violation of the Student Conduct Procedures, including:
      1. Falsification, distortion, or misrepresentation of information related to a student discipline matter.
      2. Disruption or interference with the orderly progress of a student discipline proceeding.
      3. Initiation of a student discipline proceeding in bad faith.
      4. Attempting to discourage another from participating in the student discipline matter.
      5. Attempting to influence the impartiality of any participant in a student discipline matter.
      6. Verbal or physical harassment or intimidation of any participant in a student discipline matter.
      7. Failure to comply with the sanction(s) imposed under a student discipline proceeding.
    20. Encouraging, permitting, or assisting another to do any act that could subject him or her to discipline.
  3. Procedures for Enforcing This Code
    The Chancellor shall adopt procedures to ensure students are afforded appropriate notice and an opportunity to be heard before the University imposes any sanction for a violation of the Student Conduct Code.
  4. Application of This Code
    Sanctions for the conduct listed above can be imposed on applicants, enrolled students, students between academic terms, graduates awaiting degrees, and students who withdraw from school while a disciplinary matter is pending. Conduct that threatens the safety or security of the campus community, or substantially disrupts the functions or operation of the University is within the jurisdiction of this Article regardless of whether it occurs on or off campus. Nothing in this Code may conflict with Education Code Section 66301 that prohibits disciplinary action against students based on behavior protected by the First Amendment.

Summary of Civil and Criminal Penalties for Violation of Federal Copyright Laws
As referenced earlier in Section XXI, Student Conduct (15) (G) the penalties for copyright infringement include civil and criminal penalties. In general, anyone found liable for civil copyright infringement may be ordered to pay either actual damages or “statutory” damages affixed at not less than $750 and not more than $30,000 per work infringed. For “willful” infringement, a court may award up to $150,000 per work infringed. A court can, in its discretion, also assess costs and attorneys’ fees. For details, see Title 17, United States Code, Sections 504, 505. Willful copyright infringement can also result in criminal penalties, including imprisonment of up to five years and fines. (See 17 U.S.C. §506 and 18 U.S.C. §2319)

Student Health Services  

The complete policy text can be found on the CI website. 

(SA.19.001) 

Student Mental Health Services

The complete policy text can be found on the CI website.

(SA.19.002)  

Student Privacy

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA)

The complete policy text can be found on the CI website.

(AA.14.001)

Privacy Rights of Students in Education Records

The federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (20 U.S.C. 1232g) and regulations adopted there under (34 C.F.R. 99) set out requirements designed to protect students’ privacy in their records maintained by the campus. The statute and regulations govern access to certain student records maintained by the campus and the release of such records. The law provides that the campus must give students access to most records directly related to the student, and must also provide opportunity for a hearing to challenge the records if the student claims they are inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise inappropriate. The right to a hearing under this law does not include any right to challenge the appropriateness of a grade determined by the instructor. The law generally requires the institution to receive a student’s written consent before releasing personally identifiable data about the student. The institution has adopted a set of policies and procedures governing implementation of the statute and the regulations. Copies of these policies and procedures may be obtained at Enrollment Services. Among the types of information included in the campus statement of policies and procedures are: (1) the types of student records maintained and the information they contain; (2) the official responsible for maintaining each type of record; (3) the location of access lists indicating persons requesting or receiving information from the record; (4) policies for reviewing and expunging records; (5) student access rights to their records; (6) the procedures for challenging the content of student records; (7) the cost to be charged for reproducing copies of records; and (8) the right of the student to file a complaint with the Department of Education. The Department of Education has established an office and review board to investigate complaints and adjudicate violations. The designated office is: Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20202-5920.

The campus is authorized under the Act to release “directory information” concerning students. “Directory information” may include the student’s name, address, telephone listing, electronic mail address, photograph, date and place of birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, grade level, enrollment status, degrees, honors, and awards received, and the most recent previous educational agency or institution attended by the student. The above-designated information is subject to release by the campus at any time unless the campus has received prior written objection from the student specifying what information the student requests not be released. Written objections should be sent to the University Registrar.

The campus is authorized to provide access to student records to campus officials and employees who have legitimate educational interests in such access. These persons have responsibilities in the campus’s academic, administrative or service functions and have reason for accessing student records associated with their campus or other related academic responsibilities. Student records may also be disclosed to other persons or organizations under certain conditions (e.g., as part of the accreditation or program evaluation; in response to a court order or subpoena; in connection with financial aid; or to other institutions to which the student is transferring).

Social Security Number, Uses of

Applicants are required to include their correct social security numbers in designated places on applications for admission pursuant to the authority contained in Section 41201, Title 5, California Code of Regulations, and Section 6109 of the Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. 6109). The University uses the social security number to identify students and their records including identification for purposes of financial aid eligibility and disbursement and the repayment of financial aid and other debts payable to the institution. Also, the Internal Revenue Service requires the University to file information returns that include the student’s social security number and other information such as the amount paid for qualified tuition, related expenses, and interest on educational loans. This information is used by the IRS to help determine whether a student, or a person claiming a student as a dependent, may take a credit or deduction to reduce federal income taxes.