Nov 30, 2020  
2020-2021 Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Catalog

Environmental Science & Resource Management


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Today’s environmental problems call for individuals educated in more than one traditional discipline. Environmental professionals need both well-honed technical skills and deep awareness of the political, economic, and social dimensions of environmental challenges. The Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science & Resource Management (ESRM) merges core training in physical, biological, social, and data sciences with a wide array of traditional and emerging management tools designed to reduce adverse environmental impacts and foster well-functioning, more sustainable ecosystems.

In the narrowest sense, Environmental Science quantifies the impact of humans upon physical and biological systems, and measures the dependence of human systems upon natural resources. More broadly, Environmental Science explores the interaction and co-evolution of human, physical, and biological systems and, therefore, requires integral knowledge of both natural (physical and biological systems) and social (economic, political, etc. systems) science. Resource Management is concerned with deploying the most effective means to avoid damaging our environment and sustainably using natural resources within the context of social institutions. Effective Resource Management considers benefits and costs, uncertainties and risks, limits of knowledge, institutional constraints, and social and political realities. Traditionally, Environmental Science has been presented as a distinct endeavor, mostly unrelated to Resource Management. ESRM braids these two into a single academic program to better prepare students to document, understand, and provide practical solutions to existing environmental challenges.

ESRM majors choose a course of study emphasizing either 1) Earth Systems or 2) Marine and Coastal Systems. All students take identical foundational courses before enrolling in upper division coursework and electives based upon their emphasis. Earth Systems graduates are prepared to explore and respond to challenges across an array of global and terrestrial systems (water, land, or ecological). Marine and Coastal Systems graduates are equipped to manage and conserve coastal and offshore systems (estuaries, beaches, oceanic processes, fish populations, etc.). Regardless of emphasis, all students graduate with practical field, geospatial, and community-based research experience, as well as the ability to understand and meaningfully engage diverse stakeholders.

Students interested in entering the environmental consulting or monitoring industries may complete an optional certificate in Environmental Technologies wherein they can further advance their geospatial, drone, remotely operated vehicle, and/or remote sensing skills beyond the foundations afforded in the B.S. in ESRM curriculum. 

Careers

The ESRM curriculum prepares students for a range of professional environmental careers across industry, government, and non-profit organizations as well as for subsequent graduate study. Popular career pathways include environmental consultant, restoration ecologist, park ranger, GIS technician, policy analyst, hydrologist, environmental educator, urban planner, environmental impact analyst, environmental compliance, and sustainability officer.

Program Learning Outcomes

Students graduating from the ESRM program will be able to:

  • Identify the scientific, social scientific, and humanistic aspects of environmental issues;
  • Identify, locate, evaluate, synthesize, and present current research and information on environmental issues;
  • Define environmental problems from the perspectives of both environmental science and resource management;
  • Identify possible causes and propose solutions to environmental problems from the perspectives of both environmental science and resource management;
  • Evaluate proposed solutions to environmental problems from the perspectives of both environmental science and resource management;
  • Use the methodologies of the natural and social sciences to formulate testable hypotheses concerning environmental problems and issues;
  • Collect, organize, analyze, interpret, and present quantitative and qualitative data; and
  • Make use of current, technological tools in the collection, organization, analysis, and interpretation of data.

Faculty

Sean Anderson, Ph.D.
Professor and Program Chair, Environmental Science & Resource Management
Bell Tower West, Room 1265
(805) 437-8984
sean.anderson@csuci.edu

Donald Rodriguez, Ph.D.
Professor, Environmental Science & Resource Management
Academic Advisor
Bell Tower West, Room 1205
(805) 437-8494
donald.rodriguez@csuci.edu

Emily Fairfax, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Environmental Science & Resource Management
Bell Tower West, Room 1245
(805) 437-8603
emily.fairfax@csuci.edu

Kiki Patsch, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Environmental Science & Resource Management
Bell Tower West, Room 1191
(805) 437-2696
kiki.patsch@csuci.edu

Dan Reineman, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Environmental Science & Resource Management
Bell Tower West, Room 1176
(805) 437-2079
dan.reineman@csuci.edu

Clare Steele, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Environmental Science & Resource Management
Bell Tower West, Room 1181
(805) 437-1686
clare.steele@csuci.edu

 

Contact Information

http://esrm.csuci.edu/

Programs

    Major(s)Major(s) - AA/AS-T (TMC) Degrees OnlyMinor(s)Certificate(s)

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